What will our work life look like in the year 2100?

What will our work life look like in the year 2100?

Machines and robots have already taken over many of the jobs that used to be performed by humans. This development will only continue in the future. There’s no way to stop it. The question is whether the change is necessarily going to have a negative effect. It might actually end up giving us a whole new perspective on our work life!

In the radio program “The Naked Scientists” from BBC, futurist Liselotte Lyngsø talks about what we can expect from future work life, where robots have been given all the physically tough assignments.

How to get a job in the future: be good at being a human

Take a deep breath and stop getting worried about loosing your job to fast and top tuned robots. Think about how it might end up being a total win win situation. All indicators show that the more we put technology into different areas, the more busy we get ourselves. Within healthcare, we now monitor elderly people in order to know exactly when they need water or exercise. It has created this hydra’s head with even more jobs for the healthcare providers. We will be around 10 billion people so there will be plenty of stuff to do, it will just be different tasks than we’re used to.

Today, many people get stressed and have to take leaves from their work. In the future we’ll look back and think that “people were so primitive, pushing people like lemons! Now we can actually get something better out of people, because we understand how they work.”

Yes, robots will take over many of the jobs that we have today. Luckily, there will be so many new jobs that we haven’t even discovered yet. Those jobs will require qualities that robots can’t offer, such as an emphatic mindset. We’ll make robots do the “hard work” and have people work in a whole other way. A way, tailored for them individually, so that they won’t get stressed and depressed. We’ll also go from “headhunting” to “teamhunting” because people work better together and need human contact. We won’t go on retirement anymore, instead we’ll take breaks and get recharged during our work life.

Empathy is key

“Looking at ourselves as machines, that’s a big mistake. We really have to find out about human nature. Empathy will be important and difficult for the machines to master and the ability to be irritated is going to be the key to clever innovation. Likewise people can get lazy, and that’s also a good sentiment if you want to create a better planet because we find ways of doing things in smarter ways. We have to tease out human capabilities and find out how to find our individual potentials”.

-Liselotte Lyngsø

Listen to the whole radio program with Liselotte Lyngsø and learn about what future offices are going to look like when holograms are fully developed. You can also discover why we’ll replace our traditional education with micro chips and implants of memories!

You can also read the article “This is what work will look like in year 2100” from Fast Company, where Lyngsø explains further about the subject of how people will work in the future of machines and robots.

The Baby Translator will revolutionize future parenthood

The Baby Translator will revolutionize future parenthood

Imagine always knowing exactly how your baby is feeling. A future where you can read your baby’s mind! Will mind reading solve the problems that we have in this world with lack of empathy? Or will it lead to huge conflicts? 

In a video created by NN Group, futurist Liselotte Lyngsø speaks about how we will soon be able to read brain waves and discusses the huge impact it might have on the world as we know it.

Mind reading and the end of privacy 

We already have technology that allows us to translate brain waves into language. What if you could buy an accessory or piece of clothing for your baby which in the same time makes it possible for you to understand exactly what is going on in its mind?

It’s not only the minds of babies that we have trouble figuring out. It’s not only a device for parents. Everyone would benefit from having access to a technology which makes it easier understand each other at a deeper level. Maybe it would even strengthen our ability to emphasize!

Watch the video with Liselotte Lyngsø here – would you buy the device?

READ ALSO: “3 megatrends that will transform the future of communication” with Liselotte Lyngso. 

The future office

The future office

What will the perfect working space and future office look like? We all know how it feels to have tons of work to do, but no focus or energy to get it done. In a situation like that, a nice and quiet office can be a great way to get into a productive working mood. An office symbolizes something that we can step out of, once we’ve finished our work. It allows us to work when we have to work, and relax when we’re off. Through time, the idea of what an office looks like has changed a lot. Today, most people don’t even have one. Some people consider every comfortable chair or space as a proper office. Just look at all the people who gets their work done at Starbucks and other hip cafés. Many people work from home, which allows them to stay in bed all day!

In the article “Office Space Timeline: Past, Present and Future” we take a look back at some of the previous decades’ office trends. Futurist Liselotte Lyngsø’s gives her thoughts on what the future office is going to look like. Together with another futurist, Yesim Kunter, Liselotte points out future office-trends involving culture-, design- and attire.

Offices through the decades 

A timeline from the past to the future illustrates office culture-, design- and attire. Is also states the amount of women in the workforce!

The office of the future 

What will an office be like in 2030 & what will it look like in the 2100s century?

2030s: Influence of technology 

The cultural aspect of the 2030-office evolves around how we’re going to manage people working from home, being digital nomads, while still needing a space to meet up in real life. The design focusses on technology, sustainability and wellness. Offices will be designed based on the need of every single individual and not “one size fit all”.

How will working hours be distributed and how will women be considered?

“It is more likely that a woman is raised valuing empathy. While it’s difficult to feel empathetic towards a workforce of 200, it’s much easier for a workforce of 20. The progressive decentralisation of work will provide women with more opportunities to become leaders.”

-Liselotte Lyngsø

2100s: From high-tech to high-touch 

The fact that we’re already becoming digital nomads today and that the level of actual human interaction is becoming smaller and smaller will result in a gigantic need of intimacy later on.

Read the article and discover how this will have an influence on different aspects of the 2100-office.

Read the article on this link to the BBC radio program.

Want to read more about what the future office will look like? Listen to “The future of X #1: the workplace”. A podcast with Liselotte Lyngso.

The road to driverless cars

The road to driverless cars

How do we prepare for a future with driverless cars? Panel discussion on June 23. 2017 with reporter Ian Telfer.

Futurist Liselotte Lyngsø attended a panel discussion broadcasted on Radio New Zealand RNZ where the main focus was what a world with driverless cars is going to look like.

How will companies and countries prepare for the future, which is just around the corner? Driverless cars will be a significant changing factor for our view on technology. We have to be ready for achieving its full potential, by figuring out every detail that comes with it.

What opportunities will it bring us, and how will our society greet it? Can we redesign the vehicles in order to give the consumer the same feeling of control as if they were driving the car themselves? How will it affect people, that they won’t be able to, or won’t have to drive the car themselves?

Driverless cars creates the future for co-driving

Liselotte addresses co-driving as a possible scenario that is worth fighting for. Spontaneous co-driving in cars will allow os to expand our social lives. Suddenly, we’ll be able to make use of the time that we would normally use on driving alone from A to B. Driverless cars will allow us to catch up with friends, finish our last work meeting or connect with our families whilst being driven to our destinations. It will also create opportunity to socialize and network with a used-to-be stranger from our neighborhood.

“They don’t get road rage. They’re uniform and measured in their moral response. Maybe they’ll be better than we are.”

-Associate Professor, James Maclaurin.

Futurist Liselotte Lyngsø speaks about how we are going to make driving an online marketplace, like we’ve done with Airbnb. People will collect cars as a hobby. The public interest in nice designs, usability and the interest for the sexiness of the cars will continue to rise. People will expect to rent a car according to situation-based personal needs. Private car-ownership might be essential in order to ensure a continued flowering diversity within mobility.

Who will be in control of mobility?

The urgent and most important question to solve, is the question of who will be in control of mobility. As the driverless cars will be connected to the internet of things IOT – it could be at the national level, at the car manufactoring level or at the personal level. Listen to the broadcast and find out why we should integrate the driverless cars, and make up systems so that people will share and make it possible to reduce the numbers of cars on the road and eliminate the need for most of our current public transportation. You will also hear about how  the driver-less future might be a target for new ways of hacking and terrorism that needs to be dealt with.

Listen to the panel discussion here, and imagine the road to driverless cars with motoring journalist David Thomson, Ass. Professor James Maclaurin, CEO of the Ministry of Transport Andrew Jackson and  Futurist, Liselotte Lyngsø. On this link you can also read about the speakers on the panel.

The road ahead for Uber is car-pooling

The road ahead for Uber is car-pooling

Ubers strongest selling-point In the nordic region will be to promote car-pooling.

Carpooling already accounts for 20% in the US – During his visit in Copenhagen this week, Liselotte Lyngso asked David Plouffe, VP Communication Manager at Uber and former Campaign Manager for Obama during the 2008 election about the Uber potential for democratising transport.

Watch the video with Liselotte Lyngso and David Plouffe below