The Age of Precision

The Age of Precision

Listen to the podcast from FuturePrint, where futurist Liselotte Lyngsø talks about predicting Brexit, the crisis of leadership, the importance of creativity and future trends.

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How a Cashless Society will Enhance the Transition to Sustainable Energy

In the future, companies will be able to inhibit bonuses or company cars through blockchain technology. This has the potential to significantly influence the transition to sustainable energy, but it also makes it inevitable to question the ethics of traceable money. How much should the state be able to interfere with our private lives and spendings?

Futurist Liselotte Lyngsø predicts that our society will become highly precision-oriented in the future. Here, budget conversations and conversations about money will have a whole other focus, namely on how we can achieve the highest quality of life through our digital money.

Have you ever wondered how it affects our consumption that we no longer have to sign, enter a code or count physical money before we put things in the shopping cart? What does it mean for the insight into our finances that we pay with fingerprints, facial recognition, and other various forms of digital types of payment?

Futurist Liselotte Lyngsø states the uplifting message that the young gamer generation is full of geniuses when it comes to technology. They’ll have no trouble figuring out how to navigate in a cashless society and they are already used to handling digital money in the gaming world.

An expiration date on money?

Making future forms of payment methods digital comes with so many benefits. One is that it’ll become more difficult for organized crime to exist. Additionally, it has the potential to shut down the black economy completely. In Russia, it’s expected that it will earn the state 35% more in tax income if they start to monitor cash flows in real-time.

If we use new technologies such as blockchain, we will be able to nudge people to make more sustainable and green choices. Right now, 87 countries are working out how to implement more digital and smart money into their societies.

In Sweden, they talk about earmarking the money that parents get during their paternity and maternity leave, so that it won’t be spent on cigarettes and alcohol but only on sustainable baby stuff and healthy choices. The same goes for companies. They’ll nudge their employees to make more sustainable choices by offering them electric cars through the company.

Liselotte Lyngsø has no doubt that the transition to sustainable energy will only speed up if we use technology and nudging. She even considers the possibility to put an expiration date on money. Then we can make sure that it’s included in societal consumption so that if it isn’t used, it’ll be transferred back into the company or go to the state.

Kiss your cash goodbye – in a year, you won’t even notice that they’re gone

During the pandemic, restaurants and shops already started to phase out physical money. In the future, different types of biometrical payment methods will take over.

We already use fingerprints and facial recognition, and at CBS in Copenhagen, Nets is working on a pilot project where You pay with your Dancard via blood vessel scanning in Your finger. These technologies will be highly effective, especially for people who don’t have a bank account.

“Laziness is the way forward. If you can just smile at the camera, this is the way to go. Then you quickly forget that you once had to stick your card into a machine and enter a code.”

-Liselotte Lyngsø.

A possible downside to all these new technologies is that everything might become too easy. Suddenly, the waiting time that once made us reconsider large economical decisions such as loans, is canceled. How should we manage that challenge?

“APP-ati”

In order for us to put digital payment into use, various apps are developed constantly. The Airwallet from Odense is just one out of many examples. The company makes digital payment solutions for laundries, so you avoid the constant hassle of exchanging the right amount of coins.

In other countries, you typically use the same app for the vast majority of things. An example of this is the Chinese app “Alipay”. In Denmark, we have so many different apps that Liselotte Lyngsø believes that the Danes have developed “app-ati”. We can’t stand being introduced to any more apps. We’re tired of fumbling around frantically on our phones in order to find the right app or the right customer club in a payment situation. Luckily, we’ll be able to avoid this in the near future.

Over the next five years, a Siri-like chatbot will listen in and automatically understand our needs and select the right app or loyalty card for the specific location and situation. We won’t have to type anything at all.

Digital assistance will work well in regard to payment, but chatbots who listen and decide what to propose also have a lot of power. Nevertheless, we like to use new, digital payment methods because they are fast and convenient. Just like the fact that we are generous with our personal data if it can affect our health in a positive direction.

Heightened competition

A large amount of data available means that in the future, it will become easier to spot how we ensure a good economy. Banks will be supplemented with new players who are experts at making us understand our economy. Can you imagine the possibility of your personal bank hiring an influencer for you to relate to and lean on in regard to understanding your financial situation? Or getting AI to simulate what you can achieve by acting in a certain way?

Liselotte Lyngsø estimates that the banks that are most open to new ways of putting the economy into play are also the ones that will do best in the competition. It’s about translating data into advice on healthy finances.

“Suddenly, all these new dimensions come into our knowledge. You can fast-forward your finances, and you can follow developments both in what you want to buy, but also in what it will mean for your well-being.”

Liselotte Lyngsø.

In New Zealand, they make well-being budgets where they measure what people get out of their money.

For example, if a person wants to pay 500,000 kroner for a new knee, the well-being account with data from other people’s lives can tell them that it is not at all what will make them happy. It might tell them to go to the gym three times a week, spend more time with their wife, and get a dog that they can walk with instead. This gives us completely different and much wiser budget conversations than we are used to. Conversations that are based on analyzes of enormous amounts of data, which have been greatly increased during the pandemic, where we needed data to be able to prevent the spread of infection.

In the future, we can also be greeted by our digital twin avatars in the bank. A twin who can help us spend our money right!

Maybe you want to work from home four days a week? Then your digital twin can tell you that you have to go into the office at least three days a week because you need to be socially stimulated.

Money will become digital, smart and multidimensional and much better at explaining value. The banks must utilize their knowledge so that they can make us wiser on how we make good investments in relation to being human. Both in the short and long term, because we as humans cannot see that for ourselves, says Liselotte Lyngsø.

China is way ahead

In China, the digital currency, yuan, is well underway. It’s the central bank’s digital payment solution. It has no transaction fee and in the long run, it will also work offline. However, it is traceable.

China wants to become the world’s leading state in terms of using artificial intelligence, algorithms, and data collection at the personal level. For example, they’ve measured that some people do not get enough sleep because they’re up gaming or binging movies all night. Therefore, they’ve experimented with shutting down the power between 10 pm and 05 am in certain residential areas. After that, the employees came to work happy and profitable. After that, they decided that Chinese children can only play online for one hour a day, three days a week. It’s obvious that China makes some pretty wild investment decisions on behalf of the citizens. But in return, they provide super advanced technologies which benefit the Chinese tremendously.

The Age of precision is on its way

Smart, digital, and traceable money, of course, raises a number of ethical questions about surveillance and privacy. How much should the state interfere in how we spend our money? In response, Liselotte Lyngsø sees the growing investment interest from private individuals as a good thing. She explains how important it is that ordinary Danes start to have an attitude towards their investments. They shouldn’t just let random pension companies handle them.

In the future, we will have more and more to say about the money field. This will make the market more difficult to see through. We used to almost know exactly which algorithm the banks were operating through. In the future, we will have more but smaller players in the field who are not necessarily logical-thinking but who are able to be emotional in their actions.

All in all, we are entering a new era. After the agricultural society, the industrial society, and the information society, we are on our way to the precision society, where data becomes the decisive focal point.

The age of precision will be about making wiser choices. It’s silly that a car stays parked 90% of the time and fills up expensive areas. It is also foolish to put so much fertilizer in the fields that it sinks into the groundwater. Why invest in something short-term?

Liselotte Lyngsø predicts that we will become much smarter about how to invest. We will think back on 2021 and wonder: “how could we be that naive, believing that we could figure it all out ourselves?!”

Listen to Liselotte Lyngsø talk further about the precision age in this podcast.

Or read or listen to the whole article from Erhverv+ in Danish.

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The Future of Work, Relationships and the Metaverse

The Future of Work, Relationships and the Metaverse

This article is originally written by Eva Sylwester at The Age of Aquarius.

Host Jacy Nova joins futurist Liselotte Lyngsø, to look into the future of work, relationships and the metaverse.

Liselotte is likely to be one of the most inspiring and enthusiastic people you will ever meet. Her ability to create powerful images and inspire people to align towards shared goals is mind-blowing. She will spin your head around and show you possibilities, that you never even dreamed of. Her big passion in life is to train people to visualize the future.

“I try to polish the window so decision-makers can decide to go with a clearer vision.”

Liselotte Lyngsø.

As a futurist, Liselotte tries to imagine what tomorrow will look like. For example, if the metaverse can change how we spend time with each other, it might also alter how we define our most significant relationships.  

“Today, either you’re in a relationship, or you’re single. I think in the future, we’ll have a lot of different relationship categories rather than these two boxes that you can go in – either you are single, or you are settled.”

Liselotte Lyngsø.

Liselotte also noted a brewing social divide with the potential to grow perhaps even sharper than the chasm between the vaccinated and the unvaccinated: the time owners versus the time slaves.

“More and more people can decide where and how they want to work and when they want to work, they are the time owners, and then you have the time slaves – for instance, healthcare workers that have to be in a hospital at a given time.”

Liselotte Lyngsø.

Liselotte was careful to clarify the distinction between observing that something is likely to happen in the future and personally being in favor of that outcome.

“If you ask me as a private person, you will get my opinions as a mother of four or as a leader of my company. But, as a futurist, I try to stay apolitical, as neutral as possible.”

Liselotte Lyngsø.

However, Liselotte noted that we still have the power to shape our future and not be afraid of new technologies.

“When we talk about artificial intelligence, it repeats the patterns that we already have in society. So if we live in a biased society, we’re just going to get more of the same. So the important question that remains is what kind of society do we want to create for the future?”

Liselotte Lyngsø.

Listen Liselotte Lyngsø’s entire fascinating conversation with Jacy Nova right here.

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How creative placemaking will benefit Danish society

How creative placemaking will benefit Danish society

“Creative Placemaking is an evolving field of practice which intentionally leverages the power of the arts, culture and creativity. It serves a community’s interest. It drives a broader agenda for change, growth and transformation in a way that also builds character and quality of place.”

In a report published in June 2021, The Urban Land Institute seeks to reach audiences across interests and borders. Their goal is to address how creative placemaking will bring new economic development opportunities. How it will enhance architectural designs and create a distinctive identity and sense of place to projects.

Along with a number of other stakeholders representing different perspectives on creative placemaking, futurist Liselotte Lyngso has contributed her insight and knowledge to this report.

ABOUT ULI

The Urban Land Institute is a global, member-driven organisation with more than 45,000 real estate and urban development professionals. They’re dedicated to shaping the future of the built environment for transformative impact in communities worldwide.

How creative placemaking will turn places into destinations

Creative placemaking will develop extraordinary and successful real estate projects. Projects that will have a valuable impact. Not only socially and environmentally but also emotionally and financially. It will turn places into destinations!

Have you ever been to Sydhavnskvarteret in Aarhus? Or how about Kødbyen and Refshaleøen in Copenhagen?

The city areas are examples of places where creative placemaking has transformed places into popular destinations for both tourists and locals. Also, the sites attracts both exciting companies and potential new residents. And visitors from the outside are dying to visit. The success of these places will have great effect in terms of economic value.

Besides the economic impact, creative placemaking will deliver social value as well. This will be achieved by inserting art and other cultural features to the sites. Adding these valuables, residents and visitors will find themselves more attracted to the site. This will improve their emotional well-being, realising that the site or building is more than just bricks.

Do you want to read more about how creative placement will impact Danish society and communities in the future? How it will have an impact on making our cities sustainable?

Read  the ULI report right here.

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War, pandemic & climate change: How will the ongoing crisis change Europe?

Two years with a pandemic. A war with the potential to last social and economic consequences. An ever-raging climate crisis. In a session of Foundation Forum 2022, futurist Liselotte Lyngso joins youth representative Emmy Coffey, and political scientist Ivan Krastev, to talk about how we can rethink the future of Europe.

From post-war to pre-war sentiments 

Right before the war broke out in Ukraine, we’d just started to grasp on to the hope that the world was almost back to normal. We could look forward to a life without lock down and isolation. At that moment, the future of Europe looked very much different than what it looks like today! 

And one thing that’s changed is our feeling of security. The EU union was born in the aftermath of two world wars. It’s built on the idea of democracy, social market economies, the rule of law, and the individual’s right of liberty. But it has paid less attention to issues around collective insecurity. Have we been too self-righteous and naive? 

Remember when people were hoarding toilet paper from the supermarkets when the pandemic had just broken out? Well, the same thing is happening now, just with iodine at the pharmacies and prepping cars. According to Ivan Krastev, this is reflecting how unsafe we feel as citizens of a Europe, where security that used to derive from interdependence and close-knit trade relations, is becoming a source of huge vulnerability. 

A shift into the precision age 

Society changes all the time. We’ve gone from agriculture to industrial society and now, with all the crisis we’re facing, we’re moving from Information Society and into the Precision Age according to futurist Liselotte Lyngso. 

The climate crisis will only continue to cut our resources and make it impossible for us to continue to use and spend commodities without a focus on the value we get in return – and as we have before. Additionally, we will face inflation, rising prices and product shortages because of the Ukraine crisis which will also make us think twice on how much and what we really need. I mean, 1 Euro per egg!? Maybe we should begin to rethink what dishes we really need and how much food waste to accept? 

Luckily, we won’t have to go through these major adjustments just by using our own common sense. With the quick advent of smart technology and IOT, super computers will soon be able to calculate the specific amount we need for a certain cause automatically. This means we’ll have the ability to measure how much food we need to buy so we don’t waste any, how much fertilizer we can use before it ruins our drinking water and so on. 

It’s a game changer to ask ourselves when is enough, enough? Less will be more for both the planet and humanity! Listen to the rest of the session and learn more about the future of Europe in the video below. 

Read more

Nature Calls – But what Kind of Nature?

We live in the Anthropocene period. Human interaction with nature has rapidly and radically changed our ecosystem, our habitat, our planet. We all know the challenges flowing from global warming, the crisis of biodiversity and the accelerated exploitation of natural resources. The Energy war in Europe will speed up the need to make up our mind. But the best is yet to come. What is at stake is the fundamental relation between humankind and nature. 

By futurist Liselotte Lyngsø.

By 2050 we will have lab grown meat from stem cells at a very low cost. Animal production will be transformed to high-tech facilities able to meet consumer demand on an individual level. Likewise, agriculture from the fields will be replaced by efficient harvest from local urban vertical gardens that only need LED light, water and minerals in order to get the produce to grow and with at least 4xtimes the capacity.

So, thanks to these new industries, the whole world will be fed well despite drastic climate changes, draught and flooding. This will be unevenly distributed – as most technological progress has been – but eventually the conclusion will be the same: 30 years from now we won´t need nature as we know it. Agricultural farmland, pigs and wild prawns from the oceans will belong to the ZOOs and a few organic aficionados. 

Today, half of the world’s habitable land is used for agriculture. This ratio will decline in significant numbers! On top of this shift in the production paradigm, more land will be freed thanks to driverless mobility and people working online as avatars – freeing up land. 

What will happen when this formerly scarce resource becomes abundant? Will we still care about nature, when we no longer need it for producing food to survive? Will we still respect the “limits of nature” when in essence there are none? 

This is a fundamental new point of departure for decisionmakers in politics, finance, industry, art, academia and leaders in the spiritual sphere. Vested interests will be confronted with a new reality in which they need to adapt and transform in ways they can’t even imagine. 

Two scenarios that stress the need for radical and disruptive thinking

Two scenarios can direct our way of strategic thinking about the crucial nexus between humankind and nature in the coming years. The scenarios are by definition “ideal-types”, work in progress, but they stress the profound need for radical and disruptive thinking. 

1st scenario: Worshipping nature

Technology is used to restore nature and biodiversity

So, will we respect the limits of nature in 2050? Yes of course! Climate change made us aware of the huge interdependence between mankind, biological systems and fauna diversity. The complexity of nature including chains of reactions and tipping points that we did not foresee made us humble and urged us to take action. 

After a growing number of global cyber-attacks from both hostile governments and criminals closing down the internet access for months, our vulnerability became apparent to everyone. Worshipping nature and obtaining Mother Nature’s living skills became the new gold rush. The industrial era when we thought that mechanics could sort out everything was replaced by an augmented and smart nature that was decentralized and able to survive both on and off the grid.

The true religion for most people became nature. As the catastrophes mounted due to climate changes – the green movements got more and more radical. Nature parks became sites for congregations. Wildlife Guardians evolved into a new cast of “warrior monks” fighting polluters to restore the glory of the biological sphere. Nature obtained legal rights like people as a bid to protect it from future threats. Animal consciousness was taken seriously. We no longer compared pigs to three-year-old children, but cherished them in their own right. 

People left the big cities, for self-sustained communities connected to a global grid of knowledge. Supplementing local produce and power generation with online knowhow, monitorization and the latest recipes for 3D-printing. 

Wild gardens and animals where the parking lots used to be created an explosion of small village ecosystems. Smart and varied sustainable driverless mobility freed up huge urban spaces that were allowed to lie fallow.

Back in 2030, people still sat themselves to death as most work had to be conducted sitting inside behind a screen. Now we have mind reading devices and augmented surroundings powered by body-flow and movement that makes us prefer to stand up, meet up and move around outside. The fact that much more time is spent outside makes us care way more about our surroundings and the positive impact it has on our health and wellbeing.

Concepts like interdependence and networked society, once used as empty buzzwords, have become meaningful terms underlining the umbilical cord connecting us to the planet. 

Regenerative produce has become the norm as smart tech was able to monitor watering and protect plants from pests without using fertilizers.

The world population of people is decreasing as global awareness is increasing and most of us are no longer starving. We are using a lot of both physical, social and mental energy on organizing a sustainable life locally while engaging and inspiring back to a common good globally. Biodiversity plays an essential role in all strains of life.

2nd scenario: Jurassic Park in your backyard

Technology is used to create a human centered world of abundance.

At the beginning of the industrial age, we were dependent on horses for cargo. Then cars came, and we stopped thinking about animals as a part of the transportation grid. Out of sight – out of mind! Today horse riding is for the few and just for fun. Likewise, we will stop caring about nature once we don’t need it anymore – especially when it comes to agriculture and animal farming. The business of business is business! A few areas are kept wild for tourists to explore – but interest in wildlife and nature is low.

Most of us have lived in mega cities far away from forest and wildlife for generations. 68% in 2022. In 2050, we are close to 90 percent! Mega cities are sophisticated networks of technological enhanced personalized universes providing us with all the stimulus that we could ever dream off. Virtual nature is with hyper realistic graphics and stimulus. A better substitute than any great outdoors.[1]

When we think about nature it’s the green plants that are invited in to decorate and absorb water on our skyscrapers or when visiting the local park.

By 2030, we concluded that staycation – bringing the world to our home via virtual reality rather than venturing into nature ourself – was way more entertaining, informative, indulging, much safer and easier. And cheaper!

It is not likely that we will care much about the real nature as we can climb Mount Everest in virtual reality getting the exact same smells, tastes, sensations and rushes without risking our lives, stressing the environment or our wallet.

Parking lots, fields and animal farms has been replaced by solar cells, mining spaces for minerals, CO2-storage, growing cities and concrete. Furthermore, a lot of land has disappeared due to rising sea levels.

A few gated communities with nature reserves have been kept as museums. They contain species from across time: Mammut’s, dinosaurs and more recent species – all de-extinct for research purposes and expensive adventure.

The world of people is rapidly increasing as no-one dies of old age or diseases any longer. Life expectancy is growing dramatically, as we are able to replace and regrow broken bits and tissue and have developed vaccines against cancer, malaria, diabetes and most else. Everybody has a backup in the form of a digital twin – intact with all your memories and sensations. New born babies have all had their genes edited to favor longevity and contentment.

Even our pets live until their 40s. And when they die, we tend to get a similar one thanks to affordable cloning.

We have turned our back on nature as it turned its back on us. We have become intertwined cyborg artifacts that are cloned, bred, and designed to survive – whether we thrive is a question of getting the programming right. The gamer generation has designed a multitude of realities that we can choose to live and work in. Nature has become a tired symbol of humankind’s physical attachment to earth. Of weakness and fragility. We are just about to embark on real space living, changing thousand years of history. For the first time, we will have freed ourself of nature. You will be able to construct life anywhere – from Mars to underground!

The climate changes that are confronting us will no doubt invite to radical action towards 2050 – we will be fighting for our future existence. Exploring different scenarios can help us posing the right questions and addressing the important dilemmas. Do we want a better life or a longer life? Do we want to fill the planet with people or wildlife? Do we want lifted or stupid children? The ethical dilemmas will only get bigger!

Read also: Let’s save the climate – no time for compromises!

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[1] https://www.washingtonpost.com/video-games/2020/04/28/can-virtual-nature-be-good-substitute-great-outdoors-science-says-yes/

Automation For Good

AUTOMATION FOR GOOD

In the past decades, the automation of society has accelerated. This is a good thing – at least if we know how to do it right! 

That is what the discussion revolves around in this panel debate between Liselotte Lyngso, founder and managing partner of Future Navigator and Margareta Mucibabici, Public Automation is what the discussion revolves around in this panel debate between Liselotte Lyngsø, founder and managing partner of Future Navigator and Margareta Mucibabici, Public Affairs Manager at UIPath and Rohit Talwar, Fast Futures. 

The panel discusses: 

How can we use automation as a force for GOOD?

“Technology is neutral and therefore, it is our job to use it RIGHT and transform it into an improved future.”

Liselotte Lyngso.

From automation to precision economy

To answer the question of how we can ensure a brighter future with the use of technology, it’s important to establish what ‘using automation as a force for good’ really means. 

For futurist Liselotte Lyngso, a key driver is that the automation age is being superseded by the Precision Age. What she means by this, is that technology gives us the ability to use the exact amount of resources that we need. In other words, automation will make it possible to stop extreme and unnecessary consumption of limited resources. 

An example of this is tailored indoor climate. Instead of heating up an entire house, precision heat and cooling will allow us to adjust temperature, humidity etc. individually for each person in the house. Thus, turning off the electricity where we are not! The whole point is looking for areas where we waste energy for no good reason. 

Margareta Mucibabici agrees that precision is a key word when we use technology to improve the world. Additionally, she adds how important it is that we use technology intentionally. That means to give access, equipping people with the right skills and education in terms of ethics and user-friendliness. 

How do we smooth the transformation from handmade to automated?

We know that technology will replace jobs, that it will liberate people and give them incredible opportunities for the future. Furthermore, Liselotte Lyngso does not foresee a jobless future. Our needs and expectations will increase at a much faster rate than what automation can deliver on. Just like the Hydra’s Head, the advent of better AI, driverless cars and domestic robots will create even greater demands for tender loving care, training, and healthcare.

Nevertheless, people might lose their jobs before new, exciting jobs are created. This leaves us the question of what we can so to smooth that transition. How do we prepare society in order to address what’s coming? 

To Mucibabici, the answer is clear as day; Partnerships are the key. According to her, we can achieve much more when we do things in partnerships with other organizations. It’s about democratizing access to automation and learning with our partners. 

Lyngso’s answer to this question revolves around life-long learning securing your employability. She stresses the importance of ‘just in time’ education, where we’re taught new skills throughout life just when they are needed. As opposed to ‘if and when’ education in the beginning of your career. 

For inspiring and concrete examples of where automation is already enabling a better future watch the whole panel discussion just below! 

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This will be the future of law

The future of the practice and application of law

The Law Society’s Future Worlds 2050 project gathers a group of thinkers for raw, frank and honest discussions. About future client needs, to postulate the legal business models that will meet them in the future. 

A rise in resources directed to the use of data. The lack of a clear ethical framework guiding AI development. Continuing mixing of cultures. Exponential increases in the exchange of ideas… All these trends create new possibilities for the practice and application of law. 

But what will be the key trends to shape the world of tomorrow? How will the future world impact and change the legal profession? 

These are some of the questions in the Law Society’s Future Worlds 2050 research which futurist Liselotte Lyngso has contributed to.

Changing geopolitical dynamics

One of the subjects in the Future World Project is how there will be a shift of power dynamics between the world’s leading nations. By 2050, E7 nations will overtake the G7 in terms of economic strength. Nationalist superpowers are shifting. China overtakes the US as the world’s biggest economy by 2026.

Countries are realizing that their supply chains are international dependent and vulnerable. During Covid-19 and now with the war in Ukraine, it has been proven how uncertain this dynamic is. We will replace global supply chains with regional networks. 

Another huge dynamic change will emerge from generation Z. We’ll see a generational gap in allegiance and identity. The impact of Black Lives Matter and fighting against climate change are just a few of the social movements that will dominate future generations. 

Emerging technologies and the ethical questions that follow

We can expect that by 2030, AI will contribute $15,7 tr. to the global economy. New technology is created faster than ever, and it’s inevitable that it will only become larger part of society. Particularly, our work tasks will change rapidly as the traditional jobs are taken over by machines and AI. In 2030, 85% of all job concepts are still unknown. They simply don’t exist yet. 

Soft skills like empathy, creativity and problem-solving will be the most important qualities to master for humans. Merely having great knowledge on a subject will not count for as much in the future. It will be possible to transfer experiential knowledge from one organism to another via an ‘experience chip’. 

As it develops, our use of technology only expands. And we’ll only become better and better at using it. But how do we make sure to use it right? Ethically, fairly, without bias?  GPT-3 and open-sourced AI are speeding up this development. 

The increasing use of personal data raises important questions of who will be able to own, access and use data in the future. 

Algorithms that are addictive and exploit harming content have the potential to cause serious damage. At an individual level but also in the credibility of institutions. The pace of development and the application of AI and other emerging technologies will raise challenges in terms of potential for breach, harm, freedom of speech and liability. The current Twitter discussion with Elon Musk is a great case in point.

The future of law with a changing environment

How will climate change influence future law practice?

Climate change will have disastrous and far-reaching effects. Food, water, and energy sources will eventually empty out if we don’t take serious measures soon. But our international ability to fight climate change together will be held back by our geopolitical difficulties and too often, we overlook the role of the law. So how do we reach the Sustainable Development Goals?

The report made by the Law Society’s Future Worlds research aims to provoke discussion. To identify challenges and present opportunities in the profession of law. It will help to predict and prepare for a new legal ecosystem. Raising difficult questions for further debate. When clinging to the status quo, what must the profession be ready to supply to meet shifts in client demands?

Want to read more about the Future Worlds 2050 project, the legal sector and emerging disruptions and uncertainties? 

Read the whole report written by Dr. Tara Chittenden, and contributed to by experts as futurist Liselotte Lyngso right here

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This is what your future office will look like

This is what your future office will look like

The future of the office: The time is now!

The pandemic has changed the way we use and interact in the office in radical a way. Pets, eating arrangements, smart ceilings, co-working spaces, sustainability. In this article futurist Liselotte Lyngsø looks into how the office will look like in 2030. As she says:

“As a futurist, I’ve been talking about the reshaping of the office for ages, wondering when it’s going to happen. It’s great that employees are finally actually talking about the workplace of their dreams.”

-Liselotte Lyngsø.

Future offices will make us stronger – mentally, physically, and socially

The offices that we are returning too will have sustainability as a top priority. And sustainability has many faces. We will need to be serious about dealing with our CO2 emissions: spend less time traveling overall but still increase mobility and provide flexibility when we finally do hit the road.

With eco-buildings, it will be much easier to focus on a healthy environment in the offices. Smart ceilings will detect where we walk and personalize indoor climate. The same goes for cleaning, where intelligent robots will track where people have been and only disinfect or sanitize those areas. Cool, right?

We will also be moving away from measuring company success purely in financial terms. We will move towards defining the performance of the business by how well people are thriving.

We will have to continually learn new things and therefor think about the future office like a fitness center. When we go to our place of work, it needs to make us stronger mentally, physically, and socially. Strong and healthy employees feed back into the brand and cultural connection with the business.

From daycare to pet-care

Another thing that will change in the offices is our eating arrangements. We are going to want our breaks to be much more special than before the pandemic. Companies will have to create more open spaces where we will eat together, relax, socialize, or conduct a working lunch. No more quick lunches with sad cafeteria food. Our office should inspire us to do better and be creative – while we work as well as when we’re taking a break.

Lastly, of course we will be bringing all the pets that we acquired during the pandemic, to our office. They’re providing us with so much happiness and businesses are not going to compromise on this. 

Read the whole article with futurist Liselotte Lyngsø and learn how we will go from being time slaves to time owners. How will hybrid work influence our future work life?

In the article, you can also read how Brother UK’s Phil Jones imagines the office of 2040 to look like. Or find out what FSloffice’s Beth Freeman discovers, when she investigates the opportunities that changes may present for dealers.

MASTER THE ART OF TRENDSPOTTING
AND HOST YOUR OWN TREND MAPPING WORKSHOPS

Do you want to learn how to spot trends and translate the future into strategy, ideas and development for you and your organization?

Sign up for Future Navigators online or physical trendspotting masterclass!

How gaming is changing the world

How gaming is changing the world

The nerdy aura of gaming has evaporated. Gamers are no longer just pale teenage boys, sitting in their parent’s basements all day. Over a short period of time, gaming has become mainstream and even one of the most desired types of work you could have. And there’s more: Gaming is changing the world and transforming life as we knew it.

But how? In this exclusive webinar, futurist Liselotte Lyngso explores the most important and profound transformations that will impact the future of gaming.

Here are three highlights to heighten your knowledge on the future of gaming!

1. #Metoo in the gaming field

Have you ever listened to your teenage son – or just anyone – while they’re gaming? Try it. What you’ll hear is a whole lot of swear words, cursing and shouting. The tone is harsh, and it doesn’t take much to get shit stormed by your co-players. Every gamer knows this.

The gaming industry which, for many years, has operated as a boy’s club, is becoming more diverse. More and more women and minorities are entering the field. This will transform the whole industry.

Once #Metoo reaches the gaming world, companies behind the gaming fields will have to act radical. Or they risk being shit stormed like The Golden Globe or The Ellen Show.

What future are we getting Zuckerberg Zucked into?

Before the global pandemic we already talked about gamification entering the labor market, but nothing ever really happened.

Well… It will now.

1,5 years of staying home, working from home, home teaching our kids etc., has forced us to rethink our work lives completely. We participate in meetings on Zoom, and it saves us the commute to our offices. But this new way of working has not been easy. Let’s face it. A Friday bar where everyone sits at home and drinks beer through Wi-Fi is not the same as showing
up physically after a long week!

This is where gamification will be making its magic.

Mark Zuckerberg is big about gamification. He’s working on creating a way to make online meetings far more interactive so we will enter a virtual world when we “go to work”. Watch an example of Zuckerberg’s ‘Metaverse” in the webinar right here.

Gamification will take over the world

We might as well get comfortable with the idea that gaming will change our lives. And not only regarding work.

Tinder is a good example on how gamification has changed the core of our social fabric: dating and mating. From going on “real” dates – dinner and a movie kind of thing, we now treat our dating lives as a game. We swipe, we play, we create manipulated images of ourselves, just like avatars. New technologies are developing fast. Holograms has been in the books for a long time. Now it is happening. And they will be a real game changer once they are accessible for everyone. Some scientists are actually working on making it possible to taste through a screen Spooky for some. Deligthful for others.

Knowing how advanced technology development is right now, imagine what dating will be like in 2030! Even more mind blowing: Think about humans’ ability to adapt and evolve. Always moving to the next level. Just like a game!

Watch the webinar with Liselotte Lyngso. A webinar that will change your mind and preconception of gaming.

MASTER THE ART OF TRENDSPOTTING
AND HOST YOUR OWN TREND MAPPING WORKSHOPS

Do you want to learn how to spot trends and translate the future into strategy, ideas and development for you and your organization?

Sign up for Future Navigators online or physical trendspotting masterclass!