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3 megatrends that will transform the future of communication

3 megatrends that will transform the future of communication

With all the technology that we have today and all that’s still yet to come – what will communication be all about in the future?

Liselotte Lyngso, Futurist in Future Navigator, was moderating Digital Copenhagen 2019. She presented 3 megatrends that will transform the way we communicate in the future.

Feedback crisis!

Over the years, technology has made it super easy for us to communicate with each other. If we have a problem with a product, we have 24/7 assistance from chatbots. The internet makes it possible for us to call or text from one end of the world to another! We will have smart speakers, that can answer any question and that will recognize our every need before we even know them ourselves. We won’t call each other – it’s so much faster to send a text and avoid the small talk! Communication has never been easier than it is today – but maybe it has actually become too easy!?

Digitalization will take us to a level where we’re getting into a person to person feedback crisis. Because we are moving further and further away from talking to each other, people will become worse at giving feedback. Standing in front of someone and telling them how they can improve, reading their body language and expressing empathy will seem unnatural for a generation of onscreeners. Most of the communication we will experience, will be from social media or from our chatbots. Not exactly the kind of feedback that we need in terms of handling the tough subjects and taboos.

Thus, the luxury in a future of onscreeners will be to be catered for by a team of people present and aware of you. To be able to hand pick the people that can give us the best and most honest feedback. People that we can look in the eye and communicate with properly.

Unlimited knowledge

The second major trend in terms of communication will be that knowledge will no longer be a shortage. This will revolutionize the way we do marketing, customer service and other empathy driven matters. Imagine if we had a chip inserted in our heads, that made it possible for us to know exactly what each other were feeling? People would make a much greater effort in handling you as a customer, because your rating and actual reaction would be visible for everyone to see.

New role models

The kids that are growing up right now are expected to live until they’re 120 years old. Therefore, their concern towards climate change is extremely urgent. They look at their parents and are totally mortified by the way they don’t feel the same obligation to make a difference. They definitely won’t see them as very good role models and will instead look up to heroes as Greta Thunberg and other activists.

So, we’re looking towards a new generation of rebels. For them, authorities simply won’t be a thing anymore. They will only want to share data with, work for and shop from people who are as determined to taking care of our world as they are. They have no time for comprise and they know exactly how valuable they are as the shortage for talents on the labour market will only increase during the next 10 years.

Watch the video with with Liselotte Lyngso and get inspired by how these 3 trends will transform the way we communicate.

What will our work life look like in the year 2100?

What will our work life look like in the year 2100?

Machines and robots have already taken over many of the jobs that used to be performed by humans. This development will only continue in the future. There’s no way to stop it. The question is whether the change is necessarily going to have a negative effect. It might actually end up giving us a whole new perspective on our work life!

In the radio program “The Naked Scientists” from BBC, futurist Liselotte Lyngsø talks about what we can expect from future work life, where robots have been given all the physically tough assignments.

How to get a job in the future: be good at being a human

Take a deep breath and stop getting worried about loosing your job to fast and top tuned robots. Think about how it might end up being a total win win situation. All indicators show that the more we put technology into different areas, the more busy we get ourselves. Within healthcare, we now monitor elderly people in order to know exactly when they need water or exercise. It has created this hydra’s head with even more jobs for the healthcare providers. We will be around 10 billion people so there will be plenty of stuff to do, it will just be different tasks than we’re used to.

Today, many people get stressed and have to take leaves from their work. In the future we’ll look back and think that “people were so primitive, pushing people like lemons! Now we can actually get something better out of people, because we understand how they work.”

Yes, robots will take over many of the jobs that we have today. Luckily, there will be so many new jobs that we haven’t even discovered yet. Those jobs will require qualities that robots can’t offer, such as an emphatic mindset. We’ll make robots do the “hard work” and have people work in a whole other way. A way, tailored for them individually, so that they won’t get stressed and depressed. We’ll also go from “headhunting” to “teamhunting” because people work better together and need human contact. We won’t go on retirement anymore, instead we’ll take breaks and get recharged during our work life.

Empathy is key

“Looking at ourselves as machines, that’s a big mistake. We really have to find out about human nature. Empathy will be important and difficult for the machines to master and the ability to be irritated is going to be the key to clever innovation. Likewise people can get lazy, and that’s also a good sentiment if you want to create a better planet because we find ways of doing things in smarter ways. We have to tease out human capabilities and find out how to find our individual potentials”.

-Liselotte Lyngsø

Listen to the whole radio program with Liselotte Lyngsø and learn about what future offices are going to look like when holograms are fully developed. You can also discover why we’ll replace our traditional education with micro chips and implants of memories!

You can also read the article “This is what work will look like in year 2100” from Fast Company, where Lyngsø explains further about the subject of how people will work in the future of machines and robots.

The Baby Translator will revolutionize future parenthood

The Baby Translator will revolutionize future parenthood

Imagine always knowing exactly how your baby is feeling. A future where you can read your baby’s mind! Will mind reading solve the problems that we have in this world with lack of empathy? Or will it lead to huge conflicts? 

In a video created by NN Group, futurist Liselotte Lyngsø speaks about how we will soon be able to read brain waves and discusses the huge impact it might have on the world as we know it.

Mind reading and the end of privacy 

We already have technology that allows us to translate brain waves into language. What if you could buy an accessory or piece of clothing for your baby which in the same time makes it possible for you to understand exactly what is going on in its mind?

It’s not only the minds of babies that we have trouble figuring out. It’s not only a device for parents. Everyone would benefit from having access to a technology which makes it easier understand each other at a deeper level. Maybe it would even strengthen our ability to emphasize!

Watch the video with Liselotte Lyngsø here – would you buy the device?

READ ALSO: “3 megatrends that will transform the future of communication” with Liselotte Lyngso. 

The road ahead for Uber is car-pooling

The road ahead for Uber is car-pooling

Ubers strongest selling-point In the nordic region will be to promote car-pooling.

Carpooling already accounts for 20% in the US – During his visit in Copenhagen this week, Liselotte Lyngso asked David Plouffe, VP Communication Manager at Uber and former Campaign Manager for Obama during the 2008 election about the Uber potential for democratising transport.

Watch the video with Liselotte Lyngso and David Plouffe below